oops, it’s autumn (i mean winter)

Well… it appears that we haven’t done a blog post in roughly five months. Which then suddenly morphed to eight months after starting this. That’s unfortunate as many amazing things transpired in late spring and all through summer, then autumn. And some seriously unamazing as well.

Here’s the nutshell version of things, as we couldn’t possibly share it all, but first, happy autumn!… and happy winter!

Our first batch of 12 chickens are all grown up and laying. This is Raven, our champion layer of mostly massive double yolk eggs (this photo was taken before the run was enlarged to include the chicken compost she’s on).

I know we started with a lot more than that but one died, as you recall, 10 went to the neighbors per a prearranged deal, and I have since sold 5 troublemakers. It was either sell or soup and even though I bought all of the proper knives and accoutrements, I opted for the sell option this time around. Next year soup. Lots and lots of soup.

Our second batch of chickens (7 girls) are about to start laying too, probably right around the time of the ducks within the next three or four weeks. Update: a few of our second girls are now laying. Not a duck egg in sight.

Two of them are Olive Eggers, one is an Easter Egger that I got as a surprise bonus and to our Golden Cuckoo Marans so we have the beginnings of a rainbow egg basket. Just need some blues, darker greens and more chocolatey chocolate. That’ll happen by Spring for sure.

Our third batch of chicks (10 girls and 2 boys) may not start laying until Spring either, unless they want to be winter layers. I think I have two but I’m not positive yet. In retrospect, July born babies aren’t the best idea. They end up being freeloaders a lot longer than spring or late fall babies.

And then we hatched our own chicks, but that’s a different story. We have 33 chickens now. ♡

Ducks are disgusting little beasts as babies, I’m warning you. You need to change their brooder every single day and it’s… yuck. If I were a nicer human, I would have changed it twice a day. I’m not that nice.

Ducks as teens and young ladies (as in outside ducks) are freaking awesome! They will make you laugh and smile and totally crack up several times a day, every day. They are the best farm entertainment I could possibly think of (outside of goats, which will hopefully also happen in Spring). And the most impatient (try to change their pool water without them getting in until you’re done — not going to happen). Three more ducks are getting added to the farm in February.

The garden was kind of a sad story this year. It started awesome in spring, then turned lame with the start of summer.

Thankfully it got mostly awesome again after that.

We had previously decided that all we were going to grow year one was stuff for us to eat on our homestead and get to the market garden growing and farm sales next summer.

Anyone who knows me knows that I can grow the crap out of anything except (bell peppers from seeds — we frequently quarrel) but most of our garden just refused to grow. And what did grow, the deer mostly ate. Except squash. The whole no fence thing? Dumb idea, at least until things are established. We’re buying some fences within the next few weeks to protect our autumn garden.

(Yeah, that actually already happened — we now have about a 3000sf fenced garden area.)

After a couple months of little to nothing going as planned in the garden, we tested our water PH. Things had been growing amazingly when watered by the rain but when we switched to well water via hose, they stopped growing. That was the problem! 8.4 ph, I think it was. Or 8.6? Now that we have that sorted out, everything is growing miraculously well again… just in time for autumn. Except our rainbow fingerling carrots that got off to a poor start.

Fruit has been a totally different story. Plums, pears, blackberries and apples have been so abundant. We even had early blueberries and cherries.

Canning has been awesome this year! My favorite so far was a maple bourbon plum butter. Oh and blackberry pear jam. We also canned spiced apples, chai spiced plum butter, cinnamon anise pears, plain blackberry jam and we’re about to do some pickled apples this week. (That was months ago.) I’ll keep you posted on that one. (Next year I’ll do a post on pickled apples.) I’ll probably also do some apple and pear sauce. (Didn’t happen.)

Cabin one still isn’t done but we literally didn’t touch it until about a week or two ago because we’ve been too busy with animals, orchard planting and other plantings… and everything else. I think the last time we worked in it was November? Maybe December? But the floors are now all done, all of the electrical is done, drywall and insulation is about to start going up in the living room and kitchen and everything will soon be textured and painted like that.

Holy crap, and we have a bathroom sink! With hot water to wash your hands! I can’t find the pic right now but I’ll share soon.

Paul ended up having to get a job and we discovered that he miscounted that we’re 9 pieces short on drywall so the cabin is once again on hold. Working 6 or more days a week it’s just way too much for that sweet man and I can’t do drywall myself. But, I can tape and mud once it’s up!

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2 Replies to “oops, it’s autumn (i mean winter)”

  1. Everything is so beautiful! I loved my goats, talk about making you laugh and good entertainment! I had to just fence in the stuff I didn’t want them to eat cause I couldn’t seem to make a fence they didn’t get out of, lol. I loved that they would come running up on the porch, jump up on a bench and look in to see what I was doing and the way they ran up to meet me when I came driving down the driveway always doing the kick jumps. hahaha! I was so surprised how well they stuck around home. But I think you know, gotta do something to keep them away from rhododendrons … and wouldn’t hurt to keep a tube of charcoal jell. I am so envious of your amazing farm!

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    1. Your goats sounds like they were so amazing! I remember you telling me about them before but I don’t recall how many you had or what type. They are the cutest! We are goats when I was little but I don’t remember much. Thankfully our Garden is now fenced in against the deer and is pretty much done. We need to go a bit higher to make it eight feet for the aforementioned deer but it’s plenty good to keep goats out, I think. And we don’t have any rhododendrons so that’s a huge plus as well. We do have a ton of Pennyroyal though so once we breed them I’ll have to make absolutely sure to keep him away from it. Though a few of my lady farmer friends with goats have told me that they typically won’t eat anything they shouldn’t have if they are well-fed but who knows. Our neighbor used to live here growing up and they had goats and no house other than a lean-to they moved around to different parts of the property where they tied up the goats and I was thrilled to hear but nothing ever got them but we will definitely be building a goat house beforehand. I’m hoping to get to dwarf Nigerian doelings in the spring or summer, though I may start off with some goats from my friend with a goat and sheep farm down the street as they’ll be more affordable. I’m not sure what kind she has but Nigerian are my dream goats for milk, butter and cheese.

      I’ll have to look up charcoal gel, thank you!

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