chickens and gardens. wait. nevermind.

This is the blog post I started a day or two before our storm. Updates are in bold.

Though it’s still winter, our gardens and crops are already well underway. The recent frosts have set things back a tiny bit, but I’m confident that I’ll catch back up with my original plans and intentions within the next week or so.

garlic, heirloom garlic, homestead, garlic farm

About a dozen chickens and all three ducks had a recent garden party and unmulched all of the garlic I so carefully mulched in November. I had planned to cover it again but it’s doing so well. I decided that I’ll only do it if we have more freezing spells (garlic likes a little freezing, fyi). We’ve never had garlic this big at this time of year. So lush!

Sheep sorrel

I was pretty upset with the feathered ones at first but now we have an abundance of sheep sorrel growing where the mulch was which is an awesome addition to salads and stirfrys. Their leaves are a great source of vitamins C and E, and lots of cartenoids and beta-carotene in the seeds (seeds come way later in spring and summer). New studies show that it also is a great cancer fighter. Definitely a good “weed” to welcome to your garden. (This photo is from last year. It’s still quite tiny right now.)

Radishes sprouting in the garden

I recently planted 325 radishes and a crap load of carrots which are now coming up (two of which are too close but they’ll work it out). I need to put some more carrots in between and add some peas. The three are a wonderful companion plant trilogy or permaculture guild. I also have started an abundance of broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage in the greenhouse and plan to start tomatoes in there today or tomorrow — I’ll have to check my calendar as I’m doing things on a 100% biodynamic agriculture schedule. Oh yeah, and planted more herbs and a crapload of greens. And a million other things. If you’re not planting yet, you’re missing out! I have probably 300 starts going in the greenhouse already. UPDATE: The weight of the snow imploded most of the greenhouse and surely all starts are dead due to freezing. Guess I get to start over and kick some butt once this snow finally melts. Hopefully everything in the garden is safe but seeing as how it’s been sitting under a foot or more of snow for over a week, I kind of think not. As long as our garlic survives, I will be happy. I’m most concerned about our Orchard since the trees are still so young. That was over a $3,000 investment last year. But I’m going to be positive and say all will survive because being hopeful is good.

Organic kale, heirloom, heirloom kale, in my garden

I want to add another 100 kale or so in the garden (this is from last month’s frost). I could eat kale every single day so I will just plant a bunch (maybe not really a hundred, but a lot) and reseed every month or so along with peas and radishes. And spinach. You can never have too many greens or fresh veggies.

On another note, chickens. This one you see here, right above? Her name is Myrtle. She’s on my shit list. She’s a baby killer. She went broody just over a month ago and I gave her some eggs to sit on. I candled them after a week and all were viable but one. I candled them just over 2 weeks and I could see all of them moving, outlines of little feet and all kinds of cute and magical goodness. We were about to have 9 babies! Then, that night, she pushed the four brown eggs out from under her and pecked a hole in one of them. All four died. The very next night (which happened to be 20° f) she decided to leave the brooder and go to the nesting box for the whole night, leaving all of my second generation Olive Egger babies to die. I removed all the eggs and she continued to sit on fake eggs. I caved a couple of days later and gave her nine more eggs. She sat wonderfully for a week and then decided to move and sit elsewhere again. What the hell!? She is a defective chicken and I think she killed babies again. I candles last night and 1 looks alive, 4 look possible and the rest look dead. Long story short, she is either going to be rehomed or… soup. That would be a dozen dead chicks due to her malfunctioning brain. Not cool! I had 10 of the chicks pre-sold. UPDATE: unless she malfunctions again, there are at least two or possibly three chicks due to hatch on Thursday. In 2 days! That’s far less than nine but much better than zero.

Thankfully I caved and bought an incubator, starting nine more eggs the same day as Myrtle. I candled those last night also and 6 are 100% viable and the other three are too dark to tell but look good. Sometimes it’s really hard to candle dark brown or green eggs. These babies are 2 Golden Cuckoo Marans and Welsummer mix, a Black Copper Marans and Welsummer, 5 Olive Eggers and Welsummer or Barnevelder, a blue Easter Egger under Welsummer and a total mystery just for fun. Mom could be a Partridge Laced Cochin, Buff Orpington or something else entirely, and dad could be a Welsummer or Barnevelder or Swedish Flower Hen. Or Swedish Flower Cock as we call him. UPDATE: With the power outage, all babies died. It hurts my heart.

Speaking of roosters, remember my Swedish Flower Hen and Lavender Ameraucana that I was so excited we’re both girls? I lied. Mr. Jasper Florington (previously named Flora) is a boy. Lumin, the Lavender Ameraucana may be a boy now too. She has a boy tail and a super red comb for her age of Ameraucana but despite everyone telling me she’s a boy, I’m not fully sold. I only have one other blue egg-layer and twice now I’ve had two blue eggs in a day. I’ve never seen her anywhere near the nesting box though. And she did mount someone yesterday, but one of my Rhode Island Red girls used to do that too. She’s never crowed. I just got rid of a sweet, sweet rooster because I didn’t need three and now I may have three again. Soon to have probably 10 with the babies, haha. Two are sold, but the rest will become my chicken processing practice. We need another freezer.

Oh yeah, in addition to the 18 eggs in the incubator and under Myrtle, I have another Broody sitting on 7. That was not my plan but you know how things go sometimes. I have no clue what Olga the Black Copper Marans is sitting on other than some crazy mixes with Olive Egger, Easter Egger, Barnevelder, Welsummer and I think Rhode Island Red and Barred Rock mamas. Basically she hijacked those eggs from the nesting box one day and I just let her go with it. Barnyard mixes can be so fun! And like I said, I have 10 chickens pre-sold. 2 boys and 8 to 9 girls. I’ll keep a couple girls, sell the others, and eat or sell the roosters. I have 100% of the supplies necessary for chicken processing now so need to make that next step. UPDATE: somehow her 7 egg clutch turned to 17. She doesn’t get up much so I didn’t notice in time. I think this means we will start getting hatchlings from her on Monday and then a couple of day for about a week after that? I have no clue but… yeah. That’s a lot! I will candle them again tonight but there are at least two that I think are not viable.

Anyone else need some baby chicks or started pullets or cockerels? So far no one wants day old babies but I have no problem keeping them to 4 or 8 weeks and selling them for a bit more money. The above picture is my first batch of 28 I got last April, 17 of which were sold and 1 died at a couple of days old.

My next breeding endeavors are going to be much more controlled with Easter Eggers, second generation Olive Eggers, pure Welsummers and pure Swedish Flower Hens, with a few mixes thrown in because tinkering can be fun. I really want a Swedish Flower Hen and Buff Orpington cross and a Partridge Cochin and Welsummer Cross. I also thought about getting a few Lavender Orpington girls and crossing them with my Lavender Ameraucana for a pale blue egg laying lavender bird… if the feather color would breed true. I know Lavender Orpingtons breed true but beyond that, I know nothing. I need a couple more chicken coops! Material donations accepted, or I’ll trade for eggs and future babies. ♡ Update: probably not going to be able to build a second coop this year. But next year for sure! After the storm, the ducks moved in with the chickens and really seem to be enjoying themselves. As soon as I can get some materials together I’m going to build a little stall for them in there and clean out their old house to make it a chick nursery. With all the babies coming I should do it now but there are only eight million things on the list.

I’m going to do a full post on everything here in the coming days or weeks. All of the good, bad and ugly. The amount of trees that have fallen is absolutely devastating. It seriously looks like someone took a bulldozer through our property. But good things can be birthed of bad things sometimes. The second strip of snow beyond the trees in the above photo is the property across the creek. We’ve never been able to see it and they’ve never been able to see us. That is a tiny glimpse at how many trees we’ve lost.

Oh, and here is Jasper Florington:

5 Replies to “chickens and gardens. wait. nevermind.”

  1. Whew!! Yeah it’s amazing what one badass storm can do to change everything… Sorry about your losses, both chicken and garlic! my ducks are completely evil when it comes to garlic and onions and peas and just about anything that’s not a tomato (they will even eat the leaves off of bell pepper plants). In our old house we discovered that a couple of them can jump into the 18″ high raised beds and feast on those items so we lost almost all of our onions because for some reason they don’t grow if they don’t have tops, d’oh! So this year on our new property our raised beds are a good 30″ tall to hopefully fend off the evil ones. We are planning to grow a ton of kale as well as not that we eat a lot of it ourselves but the birds absolutely go crazy over it even though they free range as it is 😋

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s awesome to know about ducks! I had no idea they could jump so high! None of our beds are raised, but slowly over the years the will become raised beds. I’ll definitely make them higher. Both the ducks and the chickens went crazy for the garlic but thankfully never found the onions. Ours go crazy for kale too. And apples and peas. The little jerks cost us $1200 bucks in fencing. Well, them and the deer.

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      1. Hahahaha yeah we just put up fencing as well (that being said I am not very trusting of our new Runner duck who is pretty skinny and I think might be able to force herself through one of the squares if needed…)

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